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Motherhood, “Aliens,” and Nationalism May 3, 2007

Posted by kelly in Aliens, Courage Under Fire, G.I. Jane, motherhood, nationalism.
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After our discussion in class and re-watching the scene in “Aliens” where Sigourney Weaver’s character rescues Newt I realize just how much that scene enforces the idea that women will choose motherhood over nationalism. (more…)

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Gender Equality in Israel May 1, 2007

Posted by Melissa in bodies, careerwomen, controversy, female executives, female politicos, female soldiers, G.I. Jane, gender, general considerations, Girl Power, in the news, Israel, nationalism, Spain.
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I found this article earlier today about the status of gender equality in Israel. I don’t find the statistics surprising, women have been paid (more…)

The problem with the military training movie hero April 20, 2007

Posted by Liz in G.I. Jane, women and war.
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An interesting point was made in the article “No Pain, No Jane” by Charles Taylor of Salon.com regarding the big problem faced by G.I. Jane and, in fact, all military training movies. The gist is that the essential element of a military training movie, the degradation and abuse, psychological and physical, that a military trainee must go through to achieve success, inherently contradicts the qualities that we the people hold near and dear in our “standard”
Hollywood hero- “independence and instinct and distrust of authority.” I think that Taylor’s point is an interesting one, and that the contradiction that he describes may be even more relevant to the case of the female military trainee. The Oxford English Dictionary defines Girl power as “a self-reliant attitude among girls and young women manifested in ambition, assertiveness and individualism.” When a person goes through military training, at least as it is depicted by Hollywood, he or she is stripped of many of the cornerstones of “girl power”, most distressingly individualism. For in order to succeed, a woman in such a situation must conform, must fit in (to some extent). So though female characters like Lt. Jordan O’Neil do triumph at the end, it is difficult to call they victories displays of girl power.

April 17, 2007

Posted by Liz in G.I. Jane, Girl Power.
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        An interesting point was made in the article “No Pain, No Jane” by Charles Taylor of Salon.com regarding the big problem faced by G.I. Jane and, in fact, all military training movies. The gist is that the essential element of a military training movie, the degradation and abuse, psychological and physical, that a military trainee must go through to achieve success, inherently contradicts the qualities that we the people hold near and dear in our “standard” Hollywood hero- “independence and instinct and distrust of authority.” I think that Taylor’s point is an interesting one, and that the contradiction that he describes may be even more relevant to the case of the female military trainee. The Oxford English Dictionary defines Girl power as “a self-reliant attitude among girls and young women manifested in ambition, assertiveness and individualism.” When a person goes through military training, at least as it is depicted by Hollywood, he or she is stripped of many of the cornerstones of “girl power”, most distressingly individualism. For in order to succeed, a woman in such a situation must conform, must fit in (to some extent). So though female characters like Lt. Jordan O’Neil do triumph at the end, it is difficult to call they victories displays of girl power.    

Why does there always have to be a boyfriend? April 11, 2007

Posted by kelly in bound, female relationships, G.I. Jane, Girlfight, La Femme Nikita, Set it off, Thelma and Louise, Tomb Raider 2.
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I’ve noticed a pattern in the past few movies we’ve watched – every powerful woman has to have a love interest. In Working Girl, Thelma and Louise, La Femme Nikita, Tomb Raider 2, Set it Off, Bound, Girlfight, and G.I. Jane, there is a love interest for the main female character(s).

It seems like the boyfriends need to be there in order to assure the audience that these women aren’t as “hard” or unemotional as they seem to be. Underneath their tough exterior, they still fit perfectly into the heterosexual power dynamic where they are delicate and sensitive in the arms of men. (more…)

Demi Moore’s bod April 10, 2007

Posted by jenniferlewk in bodies, G.I. Jane.
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Roger Ebert, in his review of G.I. Jane, commented on Demi Moore’s willingness to “work with the image of her body.” From tomboy to pregnant and from natural to enhanced, (more…)